Stress Management


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KSM-66 Ashwagandha 500mg for Stress & Anxiety Relief, Energy & Endurance, Muscle Strength & Recovery

KSM-66 Ashwagandha 500mg for Stress & Anxiety Relief, Energy & Endurance, Muscle Strength & Recovery

799.00 – 1,779.00
BodyFirst® KSM-66 Ashwagandha capsules: Your natural stress-buster! These Ashwagandha capsules, which are a medicinal herbal ingredient, harness the power of KSM-66 Ashwagandha, a clinically proven adaptogen, to help you manage...
3X Fish Oil - Triple Strength Fish Oil 1250mg (EPA - 560mg, DHA - 400mg)

3X Fish Oil - Triple Strength Fish Oil 1250mg (EPA - 560mg, DHA - 400mg)

449.00 – 825.00
Joint Health Brain Health Heart Health
Daily Probiotics 50 Billion CFU, 450mg for Better Digestion And Strong Immunity | Improve Gut Health | Support General Health - Pack of 60 Veg Capsules

Daily Probiotics 50 Billion CFU, 450mg for Better Digestion And Strong Immunity | Improve Gut Health | Support General Health - Pack of 60 Veg Capsules

749.00 – 1,549.00
Gut Health Digestive Health Overall Health And Well-Being Orignal Combination of Strains from USA
Sleepzz - Unique Combination of L-Tryptophan, Magnesium, Curcumin, Ashwagandha, Nutmeg and Cinnamon for Restful & Calm Sleep, Supports Positive Mood & Regulated Sleep Cycle

Sleepzz - Unique Combination of L-Tryptophan, Magnesium, Curcumin, Ashwagandha, Nutmeg and Cinnamon for Restful & Calm Sleep, Supports Positive Mood & Regulated Sleep Cycle

1,499.00 599.00
Restful Sleep Positive Mood Alertness & Attention Aquamin® Magnesium BioSolve CurcuminTM KSM-66® Ashwagandha
My Strips - Sleep with Melatonin helps in Better Sleep

My Strips - Sleep with Melatonin helps in Better Sleep

699.00 559.00
Better Sleep Quality Regulates Sleep Cycle Calm And Peaceful Mind

Frequently Asked Questions

What are the causes of stress?
Everyone experiences stress at some point in their lives. The human body is built to feel stress and respond to it. The human body triggers both physiological and psychological reactions in response to change or stress. It sounds like you're under some pressure. The body's stress reaction is a useful mechanism for dealing with novelty. An appropriate amount of stress may help us stay vigilant, energized, and prepared to prevent harm. Anxiety may motivate you to study more and maintain alertness if, say, a big examination is imminent. However, stress becomes problematic when stressors persist without rest or relaxation breaks. The causes of stress vary from person to person. According to polls, workplace pressures are the most significant. Forty percent of American employees report feeling stressed at work, with one in four citing it as their primary cause of stress. Causes of stress in the workplace include When you're miserable at work, Being overburdened with labor or obligations, Exhausting work schedule, Performing hazardous tasks, Worrying about being promoted or losing your job, Public speaking in front of coworkers.
What are the 3 symptoms of stress?
Symptoms for physical Stresses include Migraines and headaches, Tense or aching muscles Poor vitality or exhaustion, Trouble sleeping, falling asleep, or staying asleep are all considered sleep disturbances. Problems digesting food (including nausea, vomiting, and loss of appetite), rapid or irregular heartbeats. Psychological and emotional manifestations of stress include Moodiness, irritability, or emotional instability, Anxiety, or unwarranted fear, Overwhelming or overwhelming feelings, a state of agitation or anxiety, Trouble focusing or settling on a course of action. Mental stress symptoms include Issues with recalling information, Inability to concentrate or focus on what has to be done, Bad decision-making or judgment, Insomnia, or the inability to calm one's racing thoughts. Work stress, day to day life stress. Both acute and chronic forms of stress exist. Both may cause a wide range of symptoms, but prolonged exposure to chronic stress can have significant physiological and health consequences. Mood swings, headaches, and difficulty sleeping are all symptoms of stress. Cold sweats, clammy skin, Reduced libido, Diarrhea , Trouble falling asleep, Irritable bowel syndrome, dizziness , stressed out, chronic illness, clenching and grinding headaches, low vitality.
How to manage stress?
The sympathetic nervous system (SNS), which regulates the body's "fight or flight" reaction to danger, may be deactivated with deep breathing. The parasympathetic nerve system, responsible for relaxation and digestion, may be activated by slow, deep breathing by taking five-second breaths in, holding them for two seconds, and releasing them five seconds later. Two crucial factors in how you handle stress are your diet and exercise routine. It's possible to have a healthy mind and body when both are in good shape. Exercising regularly has been shown to reduce stress and boost mood, as well as general health and happiness. Vitamins A, B complex, C, and E, among others, may be depleted by stress, making proper nutrition all the more crucial. Taking care of your physical and mental health via good eating can help you deal with stress more effectively.
How stress affects the body?
Cortisol and adrenaline, two such stress hormones, are secreted while you're under pressure. Your body releases these hormones in preparation for the "fight-or-flight" reaction. While this helps the body deal with immediate threats, constant exposure to stress may cause the body to produce stress hormones that interfere with other functions. An elevated heart rate, elevated blood pressure, and an increased risk of heart disease are all associated with stress. Plaque formation in the arteries is linked to prolonged stress, which in turn increases the risk of heart disease. There are several ways in which stress may disrupt the digestive process. Nausea, vomiting, and gastrointestinal distress may result. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are two digestive disorders that may be made worse by stress. It's worth noting that stress may have different effects on the body for different people. Although stress is a normal and often controllable part of life, prolonged or excessive stress may have serious and even fatal consequences.
What is oxidative stress?
To put it simply, oxidative stress occurs when there is an imbalance between the body's generation of reactive oxygen species (free radicals) and its antioxidant defences. Harm. Many biological activities produce free radicals unintentionally, and in certain cases they are produced on purpose, like in active neutrophils. Furthermore, the body may produce free radicals in reaction to environmental electromagnetic radiation, and oxidising contaminants like ozone and nitrogen dioxide can be directly acquired. Damage to many tissues is possible if antioxidant defences are insufficient. Proteins, lipids (fats), and DNA are only some of the biological components that are vulnerable to oxidative stress. Damage to cells and tissues may start a domino effect of free radical generation. Highly reactive chemicals called free radicals may harm cells by reacting with their structures and causing disruptions in normal cellular activity.